THE GREEN HORNET
On January 31, 1936, The Green Hornet radio program was first
broadcast on the Detroit station, WXYZ.  WXYZ was also known for
The Lone Ranger radio series. Fran Striker, an American writer,  
created both
The Lone Ranger and The Green Hornet.  

The Green Hornet was considered a juvenile adventure series. The
title character, Brett Reid, was a newspaper publisher by day and a
masked, crime fighting, hero at night.  Brett Reid's chauffeur/valet was
named Kato.  Kato was a faithful friend and an accomplished crime
fighter himself.
The Flight of the Bumblebee, written by Nikolai
Rimsky-Korsakov, served as the theme music for
The Green Hornet.  

Al Hodge played
The Green Hornet from 1936-1943. When Mr. Hodge
left the show, after enlisting in the service during World War 2,  
Donovan Faust played the title role in 1943. Bob Hall played
The Green
Hornet
from 1944-1951. And from 1951-1952, Jack McCarthy played
The Green Hornet on radio.  In addition, Tokutaro Hayashi played Kato
on
The Green Hornet radio program.

On April 12, 1938,
The Green Hornet radio series began broadcasting
on the Mutual Broadcasting System (MBS).  On November 16, 1939,
the radio program was broadcast on the NBC Blue Network.  From
1940-1941,
The Green Hornet could be heard on some Mutual radio
stations, as well.

Beginning in January, of 1948,
The Green Hornet was sponsored by
General Mills. The radio series had been mostly sustained prior to
1948.  However, General Mills ended their sponsorship in August of
1948. In September of 1952, Orange Crush sponsored
The Green
Hornet
radio program.

On December 5, 1952, the final episode of
The Green Hornet radio
show was broadcast.  
The Green Hornet had a big impact on popular
culture. For instance, the radio series spawned comic books, several
movies, and a TV show.  

The masked crime fighter, created for radio in the 20th century, is still
entertaining listeners in the 21st century!
THE GREEN HORNET 1938-1939
THE GREEN HORNET  1940-1944
THE GREEN HORNET 1945-1949
THE GREEN HORNET 1950-1952